Current issue

Current issue

Meeting centre, Moorsel (Photo: Filip Dujardin)
MOORSEL (BE) - De Kort Van Schaik and Van Noten connect a fragmented meeting centre with a youth house and define a successful transition…
Belgium | Dominique Pieters
Private house, Ljubljana (Photo: Tomaž Gregorič)
LJUBLJANA (SI) - The home of architect Špela Videčnik, one of the founders of OFIS Arhitekti, is situated in a pleasant residential area in…
Slovenia | Nina Granda
NOVÝ BOR (CZ) - This headquarters by ov architekti infuses history with contemporary contrasts, reflecting craftsmanship and heritage. Lasvit…
Czech Republic | Vendula Hnídková
MEGARA (GR) - This residence by TAN, conceived as exposed yet introverted, offers its inhabitants an enhanced experience of the…
Greece | Petros Phokaides

Overview of contents

Overview of contents

On the spot

On the spot

News and observations

  • Centre for Wine Civilizations, Bordeaux (FR) by X-TU and Casson Mann
  • Reality check: House of Religions, Bern (CH) by Bauart Architekten and Urbanoffice Architects
  • Stoa Emporon regeneration, Athens (GR) by Potemkin and IF_Untitled Architecture
  • Saraçoğlu revisited, Ankara (TR)
  • Moviegoer 9: Sagrada, el misteri de la creació
  • Update: The Spanish reconquest
  • Erasing memory in Skopje (MK)
  • Bed & Bunker, Lezhë (AL) by students from POLIS University and FH Mainz
  • and more…
Start

Start

New projects

  • Olympic Stadium renovation, Helsinki (FI) by K2S Architects
  • Madrid Digital Arts Museum (ES) by Michelangelo Vallicelli, Lorenzo Sant’Andrea and Nicolò Troianiello
  • Lasvit headquarters, Nový Bor (CZ) by ov architekti
  • Radar tower, Paris-Saclay (FR) by Barthélémy-Griño Architectes
Interchange

Interchange

Title

The four founding partners of ALA are one of Finland's success stories: winning a major competition at the age of 30, heading an office of more than 40 employees at 40. Besides redoing the Finnish embassy in New Delhi, they are also working on a new, high-profile library in Helsinki. Still, they participate in both open and invited competitions, and are now searching for new opportunities in America and abroad. But did they enter the Guggenheim competition? 'That one did not meet our standards.'

Ready

Ready

New buildings

  • Private house, Megara (GR) by Tense Architecture Network (TAN)
  • Prezi.com headquarters, Budapest (HU) by minusplus
  • Merrion Cricket Pavilion, Dublin (IE) by TAKA Architects
  • 'Hide & Seek' playground lodge, Rotterdam (NL) by Vitibuck Architects
  • Meeting centre, Moorsel (BE) by De Kort Van Schaik and Van Noten
  • Dvor housing, Sarajevo (BA) by AHAKNAP and SAAHA
  • Private house, Vienna (AT) by Caramel architects
Debut

Debut

First realized projects

Power plant conversion by Michal Ganobjak and Vladimír Hain, Piešťany (SK)

Eurovision

Eurovision

The built environment in Iceland has become a concretization of an exaggerated version of patterns belonging to capitalism; a cycle of boom and bust. Not only did Iceland experience an economic decline, its banks collapsed completely and needed to be reconstructed from scratch. October 2008 was the end of an era where the cooperation of these same banks and building companies (which also went bankrupt), with the help of engineers and architects, had created a construction bubble of unimaginable proportions, benefiting actors with financial clout but proving to be a burden for the general public. On these pages, guest editors from the Iceland Design Centre reveal how the far-flung European nation is slowly getting back on its feet. More humble, but also more sustainable, and with some difficult problems still to tackle.

Section

Section

Cover stories

Facades were once heavy elevations, solely separating interior from exterior. New technologies, however, have been triggering a shift towards ‘smart’ building envelopes, enabling them to interact with systems, people, and surroundings. The winning proposal for the Madrid Digital Museum (see Start this issue) goes one step further, proposing a facade that acts as an open source system, where anyone capable should be allowed to use, modify, or submit information appearing on it. In a countermove, some architects now argue that excessive technology has made buildings too complicated, and prefer to work with as little technical equipment as possible. Bogdan Gyemant-Selin, for example, applied only a special concrete for the facade of his building, while AR Design Studio opted for brick and wood as materials. The architectural discourse on machine vs. nature, in any case, is still ongoing.

Tour guide

Tour guide

London schooling

Within two decades, London has revolutionized the prospects it offers children. When New Labour stormed to power in 1997 as the first left-wing government for eighteen years, a sixteen-year-old completing final school exams (General Certificate of Education, or GCSE) in London had a sixteen per cent chance they would achieve five A* to C grades – compared to 45.1 per cent nationally. Growing up in London was a barrier to academic success; one not singularly explained by higher rates of poverty, and one that prevented school leavers to progress on into college and higher education. In the last eighteen years, however, there has been a dramatic turnaround. Investment in London's school buildings has been phenomenal.

Home

Home

New architects' residences

Out-of-the-box family house by OFIS, Ljubljana (SI)

Out of obscurity

Out of obscurity

Buildings from the margins of modern history

There are just five elderly nuns still living at the Emmaus Priory in Maarssen, built in the early 1960s and commissioned by the Canonesses of the Holy Sepulchre. The building's architect, Jan de Jong (1917–2001), who never reached a wide audience, was at risk of sinking into obscurity. His work was rediscovered by Hilde de Haan and Ids Haagsma, who spent the last few years immersed in his body of work, life story, and particularly his secret: the 'plastic number'. That number, a ratio discovered by Hans van der Laan (1904–1991), architect and Benedictine monk, is a spatial mathematical constant. The Priory was the first large cloister entirely designed using the plastic number.

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